Register Now for CPS Annual Meeting with Daniel Koretz

Join us for CPS’s annual meeting on Thursday, March 22 at the Church on the Hill, 140 Bowdoin Street, Boston, 5:30 pm refreshments, 6-8:30 pm program.

Our guest speaker is Daniel Koretz, author of The Testing Charade: Pretending to Make Schools Better

Click HERE to register now.

All are welcome. Capacity is limited, so register now. 

  • Hear our guest speaker
  • Learn about our advocacy campaigns
  • Elect officers and board

CPS non-members are welcome – Suggested donation of $15 (can be applied to membership). Click HERE to join, renew your membership, or donate.     → Read More

Don’t Miss this Upcoming Opportunity: “Beyond MCAS: Excellence and Equity in the Brookline Schools”

What: Keynote speakers Jeanette Deutermann and Ricardo Rosa, along with Brookline educators, will puncture myths about MCAS testing. The forum will address questions such as these:

 

  • What is MCAS? Is it required? What is the opt-out movement?
  • How has the MCAS changed public education in Brookline?
  • What are the facts about MCAS and equity?
  • Does my child really need to practice taking standardized tests?
  • Does the MCAS enrich or impoverish our children’s experience in the schools?

When: Tuesday, January 30, 2018, 7 – 8:30 pm (Light refreshments at 6:30pm)

Where: All Saints Parish, 1773 Beacon St., at Dean Road, Brookline

Who: The event is sponsored by the Alliance for Brookline Schools, a project of Brookline PAX, the Brookline Parents Organization, Brookline for Racial Justice and Equity, the Brookline Educators Union, and Citizens for Public Schools.

Jeanette Deutermann is a mother of two boys and one of the founders of Long Island Opt-Out, a movement for whole-child education in New York state public schools.   → Read More

Statement on Boston Public Schools Start Times to Boston School Committee

 

January 10, 2018

Dear Chairman Loconto and members of the Boston School Committee:

Citizens for Public Schools supports the thousands of Boston parents who refused to accept the top-down mandate of drastically changed school start times.

The changes were ordered with no student involvement and after parents had been asked only for their general opinions on desirable school schedules. The actual changes under consideration were never revealed to parents during 18 months of supposed community engagement.

After many hours of testimony at a School Committee meeting, 8,500 signatures on a petition, and a series of community meetings at which parents, teachers, and students from across the city spoke out against the plan, School Superintendent Tommy Chang finally agreed to a one-year moratorium.

Though there was support for making high school start times later, opposition to the plan for elementary students was massive. And there was an apparent consensus that the process itself was fatally flawed, resulting in a plan that did not meet the needs of families.   → Read More

What Ever Happened to Recess?

On November 1, the Alliance for Brookline Schools (of which CPS is a member) sponsored “What ever happened to recess?” with author and educator Peter Gray. Professor Gray spoke on “Play Deficit Disorder: A National Crisis and How to Solve it Locally.” 
 
For those who couldn’t join us, we are pleased to share two videos, one of Peter Gray’s talk, and the other of the panel discussion that followed, featuring Gray with Brookline teachers and a member of the Brookline School Committee. The panel was moderated by Adam Weiner, co-president of the Brookline Parents Organization
 
Click here to view the video of Gray’s talk, and here to view the panel discussion.    → Read More

Questions about Yesterday’s Release of Next-Generation MCAS Results

Statement from Citizens for Public Schools/Massachusetts Education Justice Alliance regarding today’s release of next-generation MCAS results:

(Courtesy of timlewisnm/Flickr)

(Courtesy of timlewisnm/Flickr)

 

Results from the next-generation MCAS exam show that, in most grades and subjects, more than half of Massachusetts students scored below the new “meeting expectations” level.  The likely result of this will be more pressure to focus narrowly on increasing test scores, which will further narrow our curriculum and harm our students.

These results raise important questions that we hope will be asked and answered in the coming days and weeks:

1) A 2015 Mathematica study commissioned by Secretary James Peyser showed that neither the legacy MCAS nor PARCC measured college readiness accurately (scores accounted for only 5% to 18% of the variation in first-year college grades). Why should we expect that this new test will get any more accurate results?

2) DESE reports that Massachusetts students are first in the nation and perform at world-class levels based on a number of measures.

   → Read More